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Bioactive Compounds


Bioactive Compounds
  • Author : Maira Rubi Segura Campos
  • Publisher : Woodhead Publishing
  • Release : 2018-12-01
  • ISBN : 9780128147757
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Bioactive Compounds: Health Benefits and Potential Applications provides information about different bioactive compounds including their sources, biological effects, health benefits and, potential applications which could contribute as alternatives in the prevention or treatment of multifactorial diseases for vulnerable population groups. Going beyond the basics to include discussion of bioaccessibility and the legislative aspects of marketing of bioactive compounds as nutraceuticals or food supplements, this book presents insights from a global perspective. Written for researchers, professors and graduate students, this book is sure to be a welcomed reference for all who work in food chemistry, new product development and nutritional science. Highlights potential contributions of bioactive compounds as alternatives in the prevention or treatment of disease Investigates the world of bioactive compounds and the many activities associated with them Contains information relevant to food chemistry, new product development and nutritional science

Marine Bioactive Compounds


Marine Bioactive Compounds
  • Author : Maria Hayes
  • Publisher : Springer Science & Business Media
  • Release : 2011-11-19
  • ISBN : 1461412471
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The aim and scope of this book is to highlight the sources, isolation, characterization and applications of bioactive compounds from the marine environment and to discuss how marine bioactive compounds represent a major market application in food and other industries. It discusses sustainable marine resources of macroalgal origin and gives examples of bioactive compounds isolated from these and other resources, including marine by-product and fisheries waste streams. In addition, it looks at the importance of correct taxonomic characterization.

Extracting Bioactive Compounds for Food Products


Extracting Bioactive Compounds for Food Products
  • Author : M. Angela A. Meireles
  • Publisher : CRC Press
  • Release : 2008-12-16
  • ISBN : 1420062395
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The demand for functional foods and neutraceuticals is on the rise, leaving product development companies racing to improve bioactive compound extraction methods – a key component of functional foods and neutraceuticals development. From established processes such as steam distillation to emerging techniques like supercritical fluid technology, Extracting Bioactive Compounds for Food Products: Theory and Applications details the engineering aspects of the processes used to extract bioactive compounds from their food sources. Covers Bioactive Compounds Found in Foods, Cosmetics, and Pharmaceuticals Each well-developed chapter provides the fundamentals of transport phenomena and thermodynamics as they relate to the process described, a state-of-the-art literature review, and replicable case studies of extraction processes. This authoritative reference examines a variety of established and groundbreaking extraction processes including: Steam distillation Low-pressure solvent extraction Liquid-liquid extraction Supercritical and pressurized fluid extraction Adsorption and desorption The acute view of thermodynamic, mass transfer, and economical engineering provided in this book builds a foundation in the processes used to obtain high-quality bioactive extracts and purified compounds. Going beyond the information traditionally found in unit operations reference books, Extracting Bioactive Compounds for Food Products: Theory and Applications demonstrates how to successfully optimize bioactive compound extraction methods and use them to create new and better natural food options.

Bioactive Compounds in Foods


Bioactive Compounds in Foods
  • Author : John Gilbert
  • Publisher : John Wiley & Sons
  • Release : 2009-01-21
  • ISBN : 9781444302295
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Inherent toxicants and processing contaminants are bothnon-essential, bioactive substances whose levels in foods can bedifficult to control. This volume covers both types of compound forthe first time, examining their beneficial as well as theirundesirable effects in the human diet. Chapters have been writtenas individually comprehensive reviews, and topics have beenselected to illustrate recent scientific advances in understandingof the occurrence and mechanism of formation, exposure/riskassessment and developments in the underpinning analyticalmethodology. A wide range of contaminants are examined in detail,including pyrrolizidine alkaloids, glucosinolates, phycotoxins, andmycotoxins. Several process contaminants (eg acrylamide and furan),which are relatively new but which have a rapidly growingliterature, are also covered. The book provides a practical reference for a wide range ofexperts: specialist toxicologists (chemists and food chemists),hygienists, government officials and anyone who needs to be awareof the main issues concerning toxicants and process contaminants infood. It will also be a valuable introduction to the subject forpost-graduate students.

Bioactive Compounds from Microbes


Bioactive Compounds from Microbes
  • Author : Roberto Mazzoli
  • Publisher : Frontiers Media SA
  • Release : 2017-06-02
  • ISBN : 9782889451852
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Microorganisms have had a long and surprising history. They were “invisible” until invention of microscope in the 17th century. Until that date, although they were extensively (but inconsciously) employed in food preservation, beer and wine fermentation, cheese, vinegar, yogurt and bread making, as well as being the causative agents of infectious diseases, they were considered as “not-existing”. The work of Pasteur in the middle of the 19th century revealed several biological activities performed by microorganisms including fermentations and pathogenicity. Due to the urgent issue to treat infectious diseases (the main cause of death at those times) the “positive potential” of the microbial world has been neglected for about one century. Once the fight against the “evil” strains was fulfilled also thanks to the antibiotics, industry began to appreciate bacteria’s beneficial characteristics and exploit selected strains as starters for both food fermentations and aroma, enzyme and texturing agent production. However, it was only at the end of the 20th century that the probiotic potential of some bacteria such as lactic acid bacteria and bifidobacteria was fully recognized. Very recently, apart from the probiotic activity of in toto bacteria, attention has begun to be directed to the chemical mediators of the probiotic effect. Thanks also to the improvement of techniques such as transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics, several bioactive compounds are continuously being discovered. Bioactive molecules produced by bacteria, yeasts and virus-infected cells proved to be important for improving or impairing human health. The most important result of last years’ research concerns the discovery that a very complex network of signals allows communication between organisms (from intra-species interactions to inter-kingdom signaling). Based on these findings a completely new approach has arisen: the system biology standpoind. Actually, the different organisms colonizing a certain environmental niche are not merely interacting with each other as individuals but should be considered as a whole complex ecosystem continuously exchanging information at the molecular level. In this context, this topic issue explores both antagonistic compounds (i.e. antibiotics) and “multiple function” cooperative molecules improving the physiological status of both stimulators and targets of this network. From the applicative viewpoint, these molecules could be hopefully exploited to develop new pharmaceuticals and/or nutraceuticals for improving human health.