Citrus Fruit Books

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Citrus Fruit


Citrus Fruit
  • Author : Milind Ladanyia
  • Publisher : Academic Press
  • Release : 2010-07-28
  • ISBN : 008055623X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Post harvest biology and technology of citrus fruits is gaining importance as the therapeutic value of citrus fruits is realized and supported by the increase in health awareness among the general public. This book is the most comprehensive reference on citrus fruit biology, biotechnology and quality. Basic and applied scientific information is interwoven to serve the researcher, marketer, scientist, nutritionist, or dietician. With discussions of fruit morphology, anatomy, physiology and biochemistry and chapters on growth phases, maturity standards, grades and physical and mechanical characteristics of citrus trees, this book provides the foundation for understanding growth, harvest and post harvest aspects of these important plants. Insect-pests and diseases, irrigation, nutrition and rootstocks are also addressed. * Provides practical tips for post harvest management. * Includes all aspects of citrus fruit biology, technology and quality evaluation. * Discusses biotechnological applications and potential fresh citrus fruit quality improvement * Evaluates medicinal and therapeutic applications and recent clinical findings * Exhaustive glossary included

Citrus Fruit


Citrus Fruit
  • Author : David Freedberg
  • Publisher : Harvey Miller Pub
  • Release : 1997
  • ISBN : UOM:39015048519246
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The first volume to appear in the Natural History series catalogues a group of spectacular drawings of citrus fruit in watercolour and gouache, most of which were commissioned to illustrate Giovanni Battista Ferrari's Hesperides, an ambitious attempt at a complete taxonomy and classification of the entire citrological world, which was published in Rome in 1646. Cassiano dal Pozzo played a fundamental role in this project: it was he who commissioned and supplied most of the drawings and then arranged for them to be engraved for Ferrari's projected work. The citrus drawings - grouped in the Catalogue under the headings of citrons, lemons, oranges, pummelos, hybrids, monstrosities and unidentified citrus fruit - are reproduced in full colour and are accompanied by a wealth of comparative material which includes the Hesperides engravings, additional drawings and photographs of actual specimens, mainly of the monstrous kind. In addition to detailed scientific descriptions of the specimens themselves, the catalogue also gives art historical information on watermarks, annotations, types of mount, provenance and literature. The introductory essays explain Cassiano's method of gathering information from a network of correspondents around Europe and consider the relationship between these drawings and other natural history subjects commissioned by Cassiano. The authors discuss the work of the artists involved in the project and assess the major contribution made the classification of citrus fruit by the collaborative efforts of Cassiano of Ferrari.

Citrus Fruit Processing


Citrus Fruit Processing
  • Author : Zeki Berk
  • Publisher : Academic Press
  • Release : 2016-07-05
  • ISBN : 9780128031483
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Citrus Fruit Processing offers a thorough examination of citrus—from its physiology and production to its processing, including packaging and by-product processing. Beginning with foundational information on agricultural practices, biology, and harvesting, Citrus Fruit Processing goes on to describe processing in the context of single-strength juices, concentrated juices, preserves, and nutrition. New technologies are constantly emerging in food processing, and citrus processing is no different. This book provides researchers with much-needed information on these technologies, including state-of-the-art methodologies, all in one volume. Offers completely up-to-date coverage of scientific research on citrus and processing technology Explores all aspects of citrus and its processing, including biochemistry, technology, and health Provides an easy-to-follow organization that highlights the many aspects of citrus processing, including agricultural practices, juice processing, byproducts, and safety Describes processing in the context of single-strength juices, concentrated juices, preserves, and nutrition

Fresh Citrus Fruits


Fresh Citrus Fruits
  • Author : Wilfred F. Wardowski
  • Publisher : Springer
  • Release : 1986-09-30
  • ISBN : WISC:89013376769
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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World production of citrus fruits continues an upward trend. Total world citrus production in 1961 amounted to about 24 MMT (69% oranges, 11 % tangerines, 11% lemons and limes, and 9% grapefruit) and is projected in 1990 at about 71 MMT (69% oranges, 14% tangerines, 10% lemons and limes, and 7% grape fruit). More than 125 countries and territories produce some type of citrus fruit; however, nearly 70% of the world total (54 MMT) in 1983 was accounted for by the ten largest producers, viz., United States (22.2%), Brazil (18.6%), Japan (6.6%), Spain (5.5%), Italy (4.8%), Mexico (4.0%), Argentina (2.8%), Israel (2.6%), Turkey (2.6%), and Egypt (1.8%). In 1983, about 60% of world citrus production was consumed in fresh form. During the 1960s and 1970s, fresh consumption increased at an average rate of about 4% per year; however, projections for the 1980s and 1990s show an annual average rate of only 2%. Countries differ in the utilization of their citrus crop. As an example, Mediterranean Basin countries use 80% of their production in fresh form, whereas the two largest citrus producers, the United States and Brazil, use less than 40% of their production in fresh form. The Mediterranean Basin countries are also the largest exporters of fresh citrus, accounting for about 75% of the world total. The major fresh citrus fruits exported in 1981 were oranges, (58%), tangerines (15%), lemons and limes (15%), and grapefruit (12%).

The Lemon The History and Effects of this Citrus Fruit


The Lemon  The History and Effects of this Citrus Fruit
  • Author : Sebastian Wagner
  • Publisher : GRIN Verlag
  • Release : 2002-10-28
  • ISBN : 9783638150545
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Seminar paper from the year 2002 in the subject Food Technology, grade: B+, César Ritz Colleges (Hotel Management School), 15 entries in the bibliography, language: English, abstract: It is not very clear where the lemon has its origin. Citrus fruits have been cultivated in southern China and Southeast Asia for approximately 4000 years (apparently a lemon-shaped earring was found in the Indus-valley dating back to 2500 BC). Between 400 and 600 BC the lemon (the scientific name of the tree is Citrus lemon) was introduced into the Middle East, one can find old Oriental stories where this fruit is mentioned. It were Arab traders in Asia who brought then around AD100 and 700 citrus fruits into Eastern Africa and the Middle East, after that they planted lemons in the Sahara, Andalusia and Sicily, bringing the lemon to Southern Europe during their occupation of Spain (in Pompeii a mosaic was found showing a lemon, but botanists argue that it became popular first in the Middle Ages probably through crusaders). Christopher Columbus carried the fruit then into the new discovered continent, known as America, where it spread rapidly. Portuguese traders came back to Europe with new varieties from Southeast Asia in the 16th century. 2 centuries later then, citrus fruits had been distributed and known all over the world. In the 1890s physicians discovered that drinking juice of citrus fruits could cure scurvy, a vitamin deficiency disease. Further efforts by scientists resulted in the knowledge that this juice had positive effects because of its high vitamin C content. Furthermore there are other substances present such as vitamin A, vitamin B and some other minerals beneficial for the human body. People used lemons for flavouring foods and drinks, bleaching printings on cotton, production of perfume as well as medicine. Even before that lemons were used, for example the ladies of Louis XIV`s court reddened their lips with lemons or to express wealth. All these new discoveries of the positive effects of lemons made the fruit popular. Today about 25% of the world′s lemon production is raised in the United States, mostly in southern and central California (the earliest lemon-record in America is from 1493 in Haiti when Columbus arrived). [...]