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Elements of Style


Elements of Style
  • Author : Erin Gates
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release : 2014-10-07
  • ISBN : 9781476744889
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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From the rising-star designer and author of the hit blog, Elements of Style, a full-color, fully illustrated book packed with honest advice, inspiration, ideas, and lessons learned about designing a home that reflects your personality and style. Elements of Style is a uniquely personal and practical decorating guide that shows how designing a home can be an outlet of personal expression and an exercise in self-discovery. Drawing on her ten years of experience in the interior design industry, Erin combines honest design advice and gorgeous professional photographs and illustrations with personal essays about the lessons she has learned while designing her own home and her own life—the first being: none of our homes or lives is perfect. Like a funny best friend, she reveals the disasters she confronted in her own kitchen renovation, her struggles with anorexia, her epic fight with her husband over a Lucite table, and her secrets for starting a successful blog. Organized by rooms in the house, Elements of Style invites readers into Erin’s own home as well as homes she has designed for clients. Fresh, modern, and colorful, it is brimming glamour and style as well as advice on practical matters from choosing kitchen counter materials to dressing a bed with pillows, picking a sofa, and decorating a nursery without cartoon characters. You’ll also find a charming foreword by Erin’s husband, Andrew, and an extensive Resource and Shopping Guide that provides an indispensable a roadmap for anyone embarking on their first serious home decorating adventure. With Erin’s help, you can finally make your house your home.

The Elements of Style Illustrated Edition


The Elements of Style  Illustrated Edition
  • Author : William Strunk
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 2017-08-17
  • ISBN : 1549529110
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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This book aims to give in brief space the principal requirements of plain English style. It aims to lighten the task of instructor and student by concentrating attention (in Chapters II and III) on a few essentials, the rules of usage and principles of composition most commonly violated. In accordance with this plan it lays down three rules for the use of the comma, instead of a score or more, and one for the use of the semicolon, in the belief that these four rules provide for all the internal punctuation that is required by nineteen sentences out of twenty.

THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE


THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE
  • Author : William Strunk
  • Publisher : Strelbytskyy Multimedia Publishing
  • Release : 2018-08-09
  • ISBN : PKEY:SMP2300000058390
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The Elements of Style is a study guide for the development of writing style by William Strunk Jr., a professor of English at Cornell University. It was later finished by his student, Elwyn Brooks White. Now it is commonly known as “the study guide by Strunk and White”. In short, this book is for someone who wants to become a writer. The Elements of Style is some kind of examples’ collection of all kinds of styles of writing very different works. It comprises eight "elementary rules of usage", ten "elementary principles of composition", "a few matters of form", a list of 49 "words and expressions commonly misused", and a list of 57 "words often misspelled".

The Elements of Style


The Elements of Style
  • Author : Stanford K. Pritchard
  • Publisher : CreateSpace
  • Release : 2012-01-20
  • ISBN : 1469955903
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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ABOUT THE ELEMENTS OF STYLE:UPDATED FOR PRESENT-DAY USE“The ancients wrote at a time when the great art of writing badly had not yet been invented. In those days to write at all meant to write well.” – Georg Christoph Lichtenberg.I was originally born in Ohio....Well, that's interesting, I thought, as I absentmindedly listened to the sports announcer on the radio.Wait! STOP! "I was ORIGINALLY BORN IN OHIO..."?Well, gosh. Where were you born after THAT?Then there are the baseball commentators who routinely say things like: "If he makes that play, the run may not have scored."Well, again, wait just a minute. "If he MAKES that play...." But the play is already over. Why is the sentence in the present tense? "...The run may not have scored." But it DID score, so in this case, the proper word is "might," "MIGHT not have scored." A baseball announcer with any feeling for elementary good grammar would have said: "If he had made that play, the run might not have scored."Oh, and then there are little niceties like this: "If I'm the Dallas Cowboys, I gotta believe...." But you AREN'T the Dallas Cowboys, and besides, how could one person be an entire football organization?Okay, okay, sports broadcasters are easy to pick on (though one wonders why sports announcers, who are paid to speak, can't speak clearly, grammatically, and well).The problem is -- and it's the problem squarely confronted in this book -- that such loose, breezy, and ungrammatical language is epidemic in print, too. Newspapers and magazines are full of clichés and buzzwords, and there's not one writer in ten who understands that difference between "lay" and "lie." If you have a friend who goes duck hunting, and s/he gives you a bunch of down, you might want to LAY the down on your mattress. Similarly, you LAY turf in the yard, or LAY bricks in the patio. But when you take to your bed for a nap, you LIE down. (The issue is clarified in this book.)Language, whether spoken or written, is like a game, and like all games, it has rules. Now, "rules" does not have to be a scary word, and we all know that in language, the rules are constantly changing. "Ain't" was once a fairly common, and unremarkable, word, but nowadays, the President cannot use "ain't" in a State of the Union address; that's just the way the game is currently played. Furthermore, we judge language, whether spoken or written, by how well it accomplishes its ends within the agreed-upon rules. (On the subject of games without rules, Robert Frost said, apropos free verse: "I would as soon play tennis with the net down.")There are many rules, formal and informal, and many little distinctions, to be learned, in language, and the author considers it fun, rather than a chore, to learn them. What is the difference between "loath" and "loathe"? When do we use "who," and when do we use "whom"? What is a gerund, what is apposition?These, and many other niceties of language, are investigated and explained in this updating of William Strunk, Jr.'s classic work. The book is based on Strunk's original text of 1918, which he wrote for the use of his students at Cornell University; it proved to be a landmark. The book was revised and expanded by E.B. White, of New Yorker fame, in 1959, but it has had no significant update since 1979. And since that time, many little affronts (for some of us, insults) to the eye and ear have gotten into the language.So here is a new edition of Strunk's classic work, with many of his rules and pronouncements expanded and explained; with new sections on proper usage and correct spelling; and even a "Rogue's Gallery" comprised of samples of egregious writing culled from current newspapers and magazines.For anyone who will reflect on it, language is an ongoing, fascinating adventure. The author intends this book to make that adventure more rewarding, and more enjoyable.Oh. The difference between "dryer" and "drier"? That, like so much else, is in the book.

Elements of Indigenous Style


Elements of Indigenous Style
  • Author : Gregory Younging
  • Publisher : Brush Education
  • Release : 2018-03-01
  • ISBN : 9781550597165
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Elements of Indigenous Style offers Indigenous writers and editors—and everyone creating works about Indigenous Peoples—the first published guide to common questions and issues of style and process. Everyone working in words or other media needs to read this important new reference, and to keep it nearby while they’re working. This guide features: - Twenty-two succinct style principles. - Advice on culturally appropriate publishing practices, including how to collaborate with Indigenous Peoples, when and how to seek the advice of Elders, and how to respect Indigenous Oral Traditions and Traditional Knowledge. - Terminology to use and to avoid. - Advice on specific editing issues, such as biased language, capitalization, and quoting from historical sources and archives. - Case studies of projects that illustrate best practices.