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John Adams


John Adams
  • Author : David McCullough
  • Publisher : Simon and Schuster
  • Release : 2008-01-29
  • ISBN : 9781416575887
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Chronicles the life of America's second president, including his youth, his career as a Massachusetts farmer and lawyer, his marriage to Abigail, his rivalry with Thomas Jefferson, and his influence on the birth of the United States.

Friends Divided


Friends Divided
  • Author : Gordon S. Wood
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Release : 2017-10-24
  • ISBN : 9780735224728
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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A New York Times Book Review Notable Book of 2017 From the great historian of the American Revolution, New York Times-bestselling and Pulitzer-winning Gordon Wood, comes a majestic dual biography of two of America's most enduringly fascinating figures, whose partnership helped birth a nation, and whose subsequent falling out did much to fix its course. Thomas Jefferson and John Adams could scarcely have come from more different worlds, or been more different in temperament. Jefferson, the optimist with enough faith in the innate goodness of his fellow man to be democracy's champion, was an aristocratic Southern slaveowner, while Adams, the overachiever from New England's rising middling classes, painfully aware he was no aristocrat, was a skeptic about popular rule and a defender of a more elitist view of government. They worked closely in the crucible of revolution, crafting the Declaration of Independence and leading, with Franklin, the diplomatic effort that brought France into the fight. But ultimately, their profound differences would lead to a fundamental crisis, in their friendship and in the nation writ large, as they became the figureheads of two entirely new forces, the first American political parties. It was a bitter breach, lasting through the presidential administrations of both men, and beyond. But late in life, something remarkable happened: these two men were nudged into reconciliation. What started as a grudging trickle of correspondence became a great flood, and a friendship was rekindled, over the course of hundreds of letters. In their final years they were the last surviving founding fathers and cherished their role in this mighty young republic as it approached the half century mark in 1826. At last, on the afternoon of July 4th, 50 years to the day after the signing of the Declaration, Adams let out a sigh and said, "At least Jefferson still lives." He died soon thereafter. In fact, a few hours earlier on that same day, far to the south in his home in Monticello, Jefferson died as well. Arguably no relationship in this country's history carries as much freight as that of John Adams of Massachusetts and Thomas Jefferson of Virginia. Gordon Wood has more than done justice to these entwined lives and their meaning; he has written a magnificent new addition to America's collective story.

The Character of John Adams


The Character of John Adams
  • Author : Peter Shaw
  • Publisher : Chapel Hill : Published for the Institute of Early American History and Culture, Williamsburg, Va., by the University of North Carolina Press
  • Release : 1976
  • ISBN : UOM:39015001871147
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Study of Adams's ideas and acts that considers life in eighteenth-century Massachusetts and the statesman's Puritan background.

The Boston Public Library


The Boston Public Library
  • Author : Boston Public Library Employees Benefit Association
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 1922
  • ISBN : MSU:31293005662741
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The Other John Adams 1705 1740


The Other John Adams  1705 1740
  • Author : Benjamin Franklin
  • Publisher : Fairleigh Dickinson Univ Press
  • Release : 2003
  • ISBN : 0838639860
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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In his activities during the latter half of the decade, John Adams (1705-1740) reflected some of the dynamics of the time. A Congregational minister in Newport, this member of the Harvard class of 1721 became involved in an ongoing debate within his faith over which people are qualified to receive Holy Communion. During this time, Adams wrote poems and essays. Influenced by Addison, Dryden, and Pope, among other recent or current British authors, Adams helped introduce neoclassical verse and the sophisticated Addisonian essay to American literature. Adams was more successful as a writer than as a clergyman. As a poet, he wrote a series of generally impressive personal poems, crafted effective images, created a memorable melancholiac, composed a substantial poem in the Blackmorean mode, and translated parts of the Bible and Horace. Most of his poems were collected and published post-humously under his name in 1745. With his uncle Matthew Adams and Mather Byles, John Adams participated in Proteus Echo, the second essay series to appear in American newspapers. Franklin's Dogood papers were the first. In his essays, Adams is most important as a literary theorist, especially when addressing how much, if at all, authors should compromise their values in order to please readers. He encourages politeness and social interaction and criticizes boring ministers, thus evincing the changing social dynamics of the time. The advice to the love-lorn column might have originated in one of his contributions to Proteus Echo.