Nudge Books

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Nudge


Nudge
  • Author : Richard H. Thaler
  • Publisher : Penguin
  • Release : 2009-02-24
  • ISBN : 9781101655092
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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From the winner of the Nobel Prize in Economics, Richard H. Thaler, and Cass R. Sunstein: a revelatory look at how we make decisions—for fans of Malcolm Gladwell’s Blink and Daniel Kahneman’s Thinking, Fast and Slow * More than 1.5 million copies sold * New York Times bestseller * Named a Best Book of the Year by The Economist and the Financial Times Every day we make choices—about what to buy or eat, about financial investments or our children’s health and education, even about the causes we champion or the planet itself. Unfortunately, we often choose poorly. Nudge is about how we make these choices and how we can make better ones. Using dozens of eye-opening examples and drawing on decades of behavioral science research, Nobel Prize winner Richard H. Thaler and Harvard Law School professor Cass R. Sunstein show that no choice is ever presented to us in a neutral way, and that we are all susceptible to biases that can lead us to make bad decisions. But by knowing how people think, we can use sensible “choice architecture” to nudge people toward the best decisions for ourselves, our families, and our society, without restricting our freedom of choice.

Nudge


Nudge
  • Author : Richard H. Thaler
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 2009
  • ISBN : 0141040017
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Every day we make decisions: about the things that we buy or the meals we eat; about the investments we make or our children's health and education; even the causes that we champion or the planet itself. Unfortunately, we often choose poorly. We are all susceptible to biases that can lead us to make bad decisions that make us poorer, less healthy and less happy. And, as Thaler and Sunstein show, no choice is ever presented to us in a neutral way. By knowing how people think, we can make it easier for them to choose what is best for them, their families and society. Using dozens of eye-opening examples the authors demonstrate how to nudge us in the right directions, without restricting our freedom of choice. Nudge offers a unique new way of looking at the world for individuals and governments alike.This is one of the most engaging, provocative and important books you will ever read.

Nudge


Nudge
  • Author : Richard H. Thaler
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 2008
  • ISBN : 0300122233
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Offering a groundbreaking study of the application of the science of choice, a guide that uses colorful examples from all aspects of life demonstrates how it is possible to design environments that make it more likely for us to act in our own interests.

Nudge Nudge Think Think


Nudge  Nudge  Think  Think
  • Author : Peter John
  • Publisher : A&C Black
  • Release : 2013-05-02
  • ISBN : 9781780935553
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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How can governments persuade citizens to act in socially beneficial ways? This successor to Thaler and Sunstein's cult book Nudge argues that an alternative approach needs to be considered - a 'think' strategy, in which citizens deliberate their own priorities as part of a process of civic renewal.

Resisting the Nudge


Resisting the Nudge
  • Author : Paul Robert Hamilton
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 2018
  • ISBN : OCLC:1098179621
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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"Behavioral scientists have discovered that people predictably behave in ways unlike perfectly rational agents or utility maximizers. For example, it has been found that when people make choices, the degree to which they best pursue their own welfare or conception of the good is often influenced by the circumstances surrounding that choice. Cass Sunstein, Richard Thaler, and many others have proposed that these circumstances be consciously shaped to take advantage of these predictable patterns of behavior to get people to make choices that are best for the chooser. Put otherwise, many have suggested that choosers be "nudged" into making better choices. Perhaps more importantly, governments have made policy in line with these proposals. Most notably the US and the UK have attempted to incorporate these findings of behavioral economics by creating what are popularly known as "Nudge Units". The UK's unit (the Behavioral Insights Team) has been credited with "getting the unemployed back into work faster, helping smokers give up tobacco, and motivating procrastinators to be more punctual in paying their taxes". Many are uncomfortable with the use of nudges. Detractors describe their use as manipulative, paternalistic, or violations of autonomy or self-authorship. I share many of these concerns. In this dissertation, I look to raise two new ways of objecting to the use of nudges. The chapters will proceed as follows. In this chapter, I clarify what counts as a nudge and respond to the objection that nudging is inevitable. In the next chapter, I argue on republican grounds that the use of nudges places choice architects in a position of domination over choosers. In case some degree of domination is permissible, I will also explore what elements would distinguish permissible from impermissible nudges on republican grounds. In chapter 3, I argue that nudges can threaten the status of our actions from qualifying as achievements; and for those that still qualify, the use of nudges can make them less valuable as achievements. In the penultimate chapter, I respond to a particular defense of the use of nudges: nudges are permissible because they help one to appreciate the reasons that one has. To respond to this defense, I adopt a contemporary account of reasons to show that one either does not have reason to do what one is nudged into doing or the nudge is causally redundant in helping one to appreciate reasons. I conclude by considering how the insights that motivate the nudge project can be permissibly used."--Chapter 1