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The Pearl Oyster


The Pearl Oyster
  • Author : Paul Southgate
  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Release : 2011-08-19
  • ISBN : 0080931774
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Contrary to a generally held view that pearls are found by chance in oysters, almost all are now produced from farms. This book is a comprehensive treatment of all aspects of the biology of pearl oysters, their anatomy, reproduction, genetics, diseases, etc. It considers how they are farmed from spawning and culturing larvae in hatcheries to adults in the ocean; how various environmental factors, including pollution affect them; and how modern techniques are successfully producing large numbers of cultured pearls. This is the ultimate reference source on pearl oysters and the culture of pearls, written and edited by a number of scientists who are world experts in their fields. •Comprehensive treatment of pearl oyster biology and pearl culture •Written by the top world authorities •Highly illustrated and figured •Of practical relevance to a broad readership, from professional biologists to those involved in the practicalities and practice of pearl production

The Pearl oyster Resources of Panama


The Pearl oyster Resources of Panama
  • Author : Paul Simon Galtsoff
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 1950
  • ISBN : UIUC:30112106601450
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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The Pearl Oyster Resources of Panama Classic Reprint


The Pearl Oyster Resources of Panama  Classic Reprint
  • Author : Paul S. Galtsoff
  • Publisher : Forgotten Books
  • Release : 2016-09-30
  • ISBN : 1333800975
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Excerpt from The Pearl-Oyster Resources of Panama Indians who valued only the meat of pearl oysters could not understand the white man's Joy at seeing the pearls, which they could not eat. The fact that Indians who inhabited the territory of the Isthmus of Panama were not interested in pearls and did not use them for adornment is confirmed by subsequent archaeological explorations. For pearls were not found in the graves. Which. Besides skeletons. Contained large numbers of shark teeth and sting rays' spines. It is known, however. That together with various sea foods. Including crawfish. Pearl oysters were commonly eaten by the tribes inhabiting the eastern shore of the Gulf of Panama and the islands. At the beginning the pearl fishing was profitable. In u days Balboa's men gathered about 96 ounces of pearls. The success of the first days encouraged the Spaniards. They organized pearl fishing parties. Employed large numbers of Indian divers. And showed them how to open the oysters without roasting them, as was their custom. And spoiling the pearls. Scarcity of historical records makes it impossible to estimate the quantity and value of pearls gathered at this time from the Pearl Islands. It is known. However. That upon leaving the coast of the Gulf of Panama. Balboa received from a local chief a tribute consisting of 160 ounces of gold and 200 large pearls. The value of the pearls shipped from the New World to Spain is not known. The official records of the amount of the quint or one-fifth of the appraised figure which the King's officers collected as a duty on pearl fishery are scarce and obviously too low. Von Humboldt (1822) mentions that until 1530 the annual value of the pearls shipped to Europe averaged. According to the Spanish Treasury records. Only 800 piastres. He probably refers to pesos a silver or gold coin weighing about 25 grams and equivalent to the American dollar. One must remember. However. That real values of different Spanish coins known as peso duro. 'peso fuerte. Peso sencillo should be determined on the basis of their purchasing power at different historical periods and cannot be compared directly with the present day evaluations. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.

Why the Oyster Has the Pearl


Why the Oyster Has the Pearl
  • Author : Johnette Downing
  • Publisher : Pelican Publishing Company, Inc.
  • Release : 2011-09-28
  • ISBN : 9781455614608
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Explains why oysters make pearls and dangerous snakes have diamond-shaped heads.

Report to the Government of Ceylon on the Pearl Oyster Fisheries of the Gulf of Manaar 1903 Vol 1


Report to the Government of Ceylon on the Pearl Oyster Fisheries of the Gulf of Manaar  1903  Vol  1
  • Author : William Abbott Herdman
  • Publisher : Forgotten Books
  • Release : 2018-02-11
  • ISBN : 065630748X
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Excerpt from Report to the Government of Ceylon on the Pearl Oyster Fisheries of the Gulf of Manaar, 1903, Vol. 1: With Supplementary Reports Upon the Marine Biology of Ceylon, by Other Naturalists AN introduction explaining briefly the past history of the Pearl Banks in the Gulf of Manaar and the circumstances which led to my Ceylon Expedition, and the subsequent work to which it gave rise, is followed by a section, entitled narrative, which deals with the course of the investigations undertaken by Mr. Hornell and myself, given in chronological order. The Observing stations where the fauna was investigated around the Coast of Ceylon are described in detail in the Narrative but those other investigations - such as the anatomy of the Pearl Oyster, a description of its parasitic worms, and an account of its pearl-formation - which will be dealt with separately in special articles later on, are not treated fully in this section. After the Narrative comes a Description of the physical condition of the pearl-oyster banks or paars of the Gulf of Manaar, followed by their classification from the fisheries point of View, and by a short discussion as to the causes of certain paars being unreliable, and of the serious mortality of the oysters. Then comes a section dealing with the Observations and Experiments made by Mr. Hornell and myself on the life-history and habits of the pearl oyster, which form the basis of some of our recommendations as to the cultivation of the oyster banks. This general part is then followed by the Supplementary or Special Reports, which various scientific friends have kindly undertaken to write upon their special groups or subjects. I feel that these articles by experts add very greatly to the completeness and value of this Report, which without them could only have given a very imperfect account of the fauna and flora of the Gulf of Manaar and of the other natural conditions of existence surrounding and influencing the pearl oyster on the various paars. Of these special Reports, seven are published in the present Part I. The first of these is on the Geology 01 the Sea-bottom, by Mr. Joseph lomas, it deals with the very fundamental question of what the paar is, how the hard, cemented material usually known (and marked on the charts) as rock, which by its presence enables the pearl oysters to live there, comes to be formed. About the Publisher Forgotten Books publishes hundreds of thousands of rare and classic books. Find more at www.forgottenbooks.com This book is a reproduction of an important historical work. Forgotten Books uses state-of-the-art technology to digitally reconstruct the work, preserving the original format whilst repairing imperfections present in the aged copy. In rare cases, an imperfection in the original, such as a blemish or missing page, may be replicated in our edition. We do, however, repair the vast majority of imperfections successfully; any imperfections that remain are intentionally left to preserve the state of such historical works.