Threats to the Arctic Books

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Threats to the Arctic


Threats to the Arctic
  • Author : Scott Elias
  • Publisher : Elsevier
  • Release : 2021-06-28
  • ISBN : 9780128232293
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Threats to the Arctic discusses all the current threats to this fragile region, emphasizing the interconnections between many environmental impacts, as well as the teleconnections between events already emerging in the Arctic (ocean circulation changes, melting of sea ice, glaciers and ice sheets) and other parts of the world. The book's aim is to inform readers about the impending, sometimes irreversible changes coming to the Arctic. University students, environmental engineers, policymakers and sociologists with an interest in the role of the Arctic in global change will benefit from the book's unique perspective. As this remote, inhospitable part of the world that few people will ever visit provides amazing insights, we can no longer have an 'out of sight – out of mind’ approach to the environmental upheavals taking place in the Arctic. Provides the most up-to-date information on this rapidly changing, critical part of the world Offers a holistic understanding of the interconnections between global environmental changes and impacts in the Arctic Examines fact-based pressure on politics and industry to preserve Arctic biota and environments

Northern Lights Against POPs


Northern Lights Against POPs
  • Author : Inuit Circumpolar Conference
  • Publisher : McGill-Queen's Press - MQUP
  • Release : 2003
  • ISBN : 0773524827
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Representatives of 111 nations gathered in Stockholm in May 2001 to sign a legally binding convention to eliminate or reduce emissions of pesticides, insecticides, and other industrial combustion by-products. Long-range transport by air and water carries many of these pollutants to the circumpolar north, where they threaten the health and cultural survival of Inuit and other northern Indigenous peoples.Northern Lights Against POPs tells the many-faceted scientific, policy, legal, and advocacy story that led to the Stockholm convention. Unique in its perspective, scope, and breadth, it reveals the key links among environmental and health science, international politics, advocacy, law, and global negotiations. Never before have public health concerns articulated by northern Indigenous peoples in Canada and throughout the circumpolar Arctic had such a direct impact on global policy-making. Authors show how research on POPs (persistent organic pollutants) in the Arctic from the mid-1980s influenced international negotiations and analyze the potential for the convention to be effective. Contributors include elected representatives, researchers, civil servants, Indigenous people who participated in the negotiations, and scientists who provided the compelling Arctic data that prompted the United Nations Environment Programme to sponsor negotiations. Contributors include David Anderson (Minister of the Environment, Canada); Nigel Bankes (University of Calgary); John Buccini (Consultant, former chair of the Global POPs Negotiations); Sheila Watt-Cloutier (Inuit Circumpolar Conference-Canada); Barry Commoner, Paul Woods Bartlett, Holger Eisl, Kimberly Couchot (Center for the Biology of Natural Systems, Queens College, City University of New York); Eric Dewailly (Laval University); David Downie (Director of Educational Partnerships, Columbia Earth Institute, Columbia University, New York); Terry Fenge (Inuit Circumpolar Conference-Canada); Henry Huntington (Consultant, Anchorage) and Michelle Sparck (Circumpolar Conservation Union, Washington, D.C.); Harriet Kuhnlein, Laurie Chan (Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University), and Olivier Receveur (formerly Centre for Indigenous Peoples' Nutrition and Environment, McGill University); Lars-Otto Reiersen (Arctic Monitoring and Assessment Programme Secretariat, Oslo); Henrik Selin (Massachusetts Institute of Technology); David Stone, Russell Shearer (Northern Contaminants Program, Department of Indian Affairs and Northern Development, Canada); Klaus Topfer (Executive Director, United Nations Environment Programme).

Polar Opposites Opportunities and Threats in the Arctic


Polar Opposites  Opportunities and Threats in the Arctic
  • Author :
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 2012
  • ISBN : 0852652976
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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A new race to the North Pole is underway but not on sleds by bearded and wild-eyed adventurers looking for new challenges. The latest pioneers tend to be clean-shaven, hard-nosed salesmen in scheduled aircraft flying in to make money out of a bleak landscape. Cold is the new hot for Big Business and the melting ice caps have triggered a flurry of oil drilling, ore digging and bulk shipping. The chilly waters off Alaska, Siberia and Greenland have all been earmarked for new energy exploration. Mega-mines, such as the Mary river ore deposits in Canada and 300 miles inside the Arctic Circle, are being prepared for exploitation.

Arctic Environmental Problems


Arctic Environmental Problems
  • Author : Lassi Leininen
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 1990
  • ISBN : UVA:35007000421739
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Volume of papers is one of five reports from the TAPRI Arctic workshop "Alternative security and development in the Arctic regions". Considers environmental threats in the Arctic including military presence, and exploitation of oil and gas reserves. Also considers prospects and possibilities for Arctic environmental cooperation.

Preserving Arctic Archaeology in the 21st Century


Preserving Arctic Archaeology in the 21st Century
  • Author : Pauline Goetz
  • Publisher :
  • Release : 2010
  • ISBN : OCLC:827754127
  • Language : En, Es, Fr & De
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Archaeological sites around the world are facing many challenges. These challenges include urban expansion, resource exploitation, tourism, governmental infrastructure programs such as road development and one of the most recently recognized challenges is climate change. The archaeological record of the Arctic tundra is particularly sensitive to fluctuations in the climate, with its fragile ecosystems and ground underlain by permafrost. The impact of increasing global temperatures is a major public issue of the 21st Century, and the ramifications on archaeological sites are significant. The impacts felt over the next century are predicted to range from a sea level rise of almost a metre to a 6.4°C rise in temperature (IPCC, 2007:13). Arctic archaeological sites often invoke a feeling of being in stasis, simply waiting for the next researcher to come along and discover them anew. In fact, the continued existence of these sites is taken for granted, and many are in fact under siege from environmental factors. While the Arctic may face some of the greatest environmental challenges to its archaeological record, it also has some of the greatest potential of in situ preservation in the world. The slow growth of infrastructure in many parts of the Arctic along with a very low population density has meant that threats from development are not as significant or pressing as in other locales both in Canada and throughout the world. This means that the potential to preserve the archaeological record for future generations and future technologies is substantial if the surrounding environment can be stabilized. This paper summarizes the effects of a warming climate upon archaeological sites and uses the Arctic as a focal point, as it is the northern regions that are currently recognized as the most environmentally vulnerable. The Sannirut site on Bylot Island, Nunavut presents an excellent case study on the importance of preservation policies as well as the practicalities on how it can be done with current technologies.